Our jigsaw collection - part 4


Click or tap on any thumbnail to see a larger image of the jigsaw.



King Arthur on Dartmoor

About 400 pieces (approx. 22"x16") in marbled pink book type box.
Published from 1931 to 1936 initially with about 375 pieces, this is the later enlarged version.
Painted by the artist Percy Spence and dated February 1928. This image was used for a poster advertising Glorious Devon which included the title King Arthur and His Knights crossing Dartmoor.



Beau Nash's Bath

About 200 pieces (approx. 15 1⁄2"x12") in marbled pink book type box.
Published from 1932 to 1936, first titled 'Bath' and having about 150 pieces and then being increased to 200 pieces. This is the renamed later version which is still cut to about 200 pieces.
Painted by the artist Claude H.Buckle. This image was used for a poster in the This England of ours series.



Royal Route to the West

About 200 pieces (approx. 18 1⁄4"x10 1⁄2") in marbled green book type box.
Published from 1933 to 1939. This is the early version, the puzzle later being reduced to 150 pieces.
King George V and train, painted by George H.Davis in 1929.

Included in the box is the original packing slip shown above, and a copy of the booklet 'The Literature of Locomotion' which is dated November 1934.
Uniquely, the picture also bears the note Reproduced by permission of the "Illustrated London News".



King George V

About 200 pieces (approx. 22"x8 1⁄2") in marbled green book type box.
A very popular puzzle published between 1927 and 1936. Originally published with 150 pieces, this is the later enlarged version circa 1934 and is cut to the outline of the engine. Also published with 'about 300 pieces' between 1928 and 1932.
Image derived from a photograph.



The Cheltenham Flyer

About 200 pieces (approx. 17 1⁄4"x11") in marbled green book type box.
Published between 1933 and 1936 initially with 150 pieces, this is the later enlarged edition from circa 1934.
Painting attributed to F.Moore, which was in fact the name of a collective studio rather than an individual artist, shows engine number 5000 'Launceston Castle' crossing Maidenhead Bridge.

Included in the box are the original pamphlet written by C.S.Lock describing the history of this famous train which is dated October 1933, and a copy of the booklet 'The Literature of Locomotion' which is dated July 1934.



The Streamline Way

About 200 pieces (approx. 17"x10 3⁄4") in marbled green book type box.
Published from 1934 to 1938 being titled variously Steamline or Streamlined. This is the early version, the puzzle being later being reduced to 150 pieces.
Illustrating a streamlined diesel railcar and 'ghost' of the locomotive 'King George V' by an unknown artist.



Locomotives Old and New

About 200 pieces (approx. 19 1⁄2"x9 1⁄2") in marbled green book type box.
Published from 1934 to 1939. This is the early version, the puzzle being later being reduced to 150 pieces.
Fictional scene showing the broad gauge 'Lord of the Isles' being overtaken by a train hauled by the locomotive 'King George V'. Painting by an unknown artist.



The Model Railway

About 200 pieces (approx. 15 1⁄2"x12 3⁄4") in marbled green book type box.
Published from 1934 to 1939. This is the early version, the puzzle being later being reduced to 150 pieces.
Whilst unsigned, the illustration is believed to be after a painting by A.Duncan Carse.

The puzzle shows two children who stop playing with their 'O' gauge tin-plate train to watch as a Castle Class hauling its passenger train passes by on the main line. The location is unknown, but the train might well be the Cornish Riviera Express.



The Fishguard Army, 1797

About 200 pieces (approx. 17"x11 1⁄4") in marbled blue book type box, but with one piece missing.
Published from 1934 to 1939. This is the early version, the puzzle being later being reduced to 150 pieces.
Painting signed by Claude Buckle.

This puzzle celebrates the last (and failed) invasion of the British Isles. French troops and ships which can be seen in the distance came to Fishguard in 1797 hoping that the Welsh would join them. They mistook a body of Welsh ladies who had come to oppose them dressed in their national costume for Redcoats and surrendered without firing a shot!



London Highways

About 200 pieces (approx. 17 1⁄4"x10 3⁄4") in marbled green book type box - branded 'CP', but with two pieces broken.
Published between 1935 and 1936.
Painting signed by Claude H.Buckle and dated October 1934.

This rare (and short lived) puzzle is branded 'CP' which stands for 'Carter Paterson' who were a major parcels carrier at the time and one of their vans is featured crossing London Bridge. Whilst not carrying any reference to the GWR this is nonetheless part of the GWR promotional jigsaw series.
This puzzle is known to have been later sold under the Chad Valley brand, either as shown here or heavily cropped on the right removing the Carter Paterson van, the aeroplane and Tower Bridge!

Carter Paterson had a long history, being constituted as a limited company in 1887. In October 1933 the Big Four railway companies (Southern Railway, Great Western Railway, London, Midland & Scottish Railway, and London & North Eastern Railway) took control in equal shares of Carter Paterson. The company continued to operate but as a subsidiary of another carrier the Big Four had bought at the same time, the Hay's Wharf Cartage Company which was better known as Pickford's. Following railway nationalisation in 1948, Carter Paterson was absorbed by the British Transport Commission which adopted the name 'British Road Services' for its road haulage operations. The red and green 'CP' device on the jigsaw box echoed the design of a card which customers would display in a window to indicate that a parcel awaited collection. So well known were the company that for a very short period in 1948 the airlift of supplies to the British garrison and the civilian population of West Berlin was named 'Operation Carter Paterson'.



Drake goes West

About 400 pieces (approx. 23"x15 1⁄2") in marbled pink book type box.
Published from 1934 to 1939, firstly as ‘Sir Francis Drake at Plymouth’, then under this title from about 1935.
Painted by the artist Claude H.Buckle.



Windsor Castle froma the air

About 200 pieces (approx. 16"x12 1⁄4") in green weave book type box.
Published from 1936 to 1939, initially with about 200 pieces. This is the early version, the puzzle being later being reduced to 150 pieces.
Image derived from a photograph.



Royal Route to the West

About 150 pieces (approx. 18 1⁄2"x10 1⁄2") in marbled green book type box.
Published from 1933 to 1939, initially with about 200 pieces, this is the later reduced version.
Illustrating King George V and train, painted by George H.Davis in 1929.

The box is inscribed with the message To Barbara, Wishing you Many Happy Returns, from Jean which is dated August 1939.
Uniquely, the picture also bears the note Reproduced by permission of the "Illustrated London News".



Cornwall-Preparing for a Catch

About 150 pieces (approx. 11 1⁄2"x16 1⁄2") in marbled purple book type box.
Published from 1936 to 1939, initially with about 200 pieces, this is the later reduced version.
Signed by Ronald Lampitt.

This puzzle has hints of a coloured border and is painted in an unusual 'tapestry' style.